Kingfish Records

What's New 8-4-23

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Geffen

Victory provides an insight into the soul-bearing vulnerability and supreme songcraft that Cian has demonstrated through his career. For him, it represents the culmination of a lifelong dream. But even more significantly, it represents a triumph in the face of insurmountable odds in which his mother’s selfless bravery, determination and support changed his future for the better.

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10k Projects / Capitol

Focusing on melancholic, emotional guitar-infused ballads, the ALLTY series has become a staple in Trippie’s discogrpahy – melding him into the superstar he is today. As the Ohio rapper puts it, “This is gonna be, if not the best body of music I’ve ever did, one of them, for sure. I’m not trying to be experimental with this project, just drop straight Trippie Redd hits.”

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Warner Music Nashville

Religiously is an impactful blend of thunderous stadium anthems and introspective ballads from the gravel-voiced Illinois native. Amongst the polished production, however, there's a refreshing allegiance to traditional instrumentation and moments where Zimmerman truly excels, particularly in the more reflective, vulnerable offerings.

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Round Records / ATO

A collection of Garcia’s most beloved solo studio recordings and collaborations with Grateful Dead lyricist Robert Hunter. Contains 16 remastered recordings including “Sugaree,” “They Love Each Other,” and “Rubin & Cherise,” among others, highlighting the performances that helped enshrine the The Dead and Garcia in the Songwriters Hall of Fame.

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BMG

These are insanely tight, bodybuilder-sculpted rock songs, and while Wolfgang Van Halen (son of Eddie) dresses each in his six-string wizardry it’s all commendably contained. Arguably, the music is so big that its best ideas get lost in the echo of its heavy footsteps, but Mammoth II remains, inarguably, a worthy follow-up to that equally muscular debut.

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Smithsonian Folkways

McCormick’s massive collection features never-before-heard performances not only from musicians who became icons in their own right—including Lightnin’ Hopkins and Mance Lipscomb—but also, crucially, performers whose names may be unfamiliar to even the most devoted blues fans and scholars. Spanning gospel, ragtime, country blues dirges and the unclassifiable music of George “Bongo Joe” Coleman.

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