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Kingfish Records

The title "Whatever Truthful Understanding" is derived from the dedication in a century old book about the history of Kentucky. The music was written in the wake of an emotionally taxing relocation from Louisville to the urban blight of Las Vegas. Conley has often made music that reflects the wider expanses of the desert, but living in a city surrounded by it has opened up his sound even further. Here he displays finger picking that drones, that leads, that bounces, that grinds. Tempos flutter like ripples on ponds, notes cascading like rain on rooftops. Here Conley truly embraces guitar techniques he hasn't before. "God Doesn't Help Those Who Are Invisible" begins with the sound of crickets before drifting into a twangy nocturne, a pensive walk through a desert landscape of trying to find one's self, which drops us into 'Just One More Thing'. This track's Junior Kimbrough-esque blues drone momentum definitely lends itself to a bad drive to something unseemly. This trip ends in a road hazard fever dream named "Mojave Pastoral'. This track includes Adrian Voorhies of Cortege on shirtless jazz swing and Keith RN Chandler of odd. Circles on dual basses and their improvised performances to Conley's guitar, along with a disembodied field recording of an unsettling trip, provide a hallucinogenic chamber performance. The comedown from this is "We Are The Creatures This Desert Makes Us". The quietest and gentlest piece, it is the perfect lull before the storm that is "Beyond The Horse Gate'. This searing finale creeps in gently before building itself up into the loudest part of the whole record, the inevitable storm, the final decisive moment of clarity. And that is what this album ultimately is - a journey. Whether one across the country, or from destruction to health, or even vice versa, "Whatever Truthful Understanding" is the compelling feeling to seek out and process. A map for you, the listener. Keep your eyes on the road.
The title "Whatever Truthful Understanding" is derived from the dedication in a century old book about the history of Kentucky. The music was written in the wake of an emotionally taxing relocation from Louisville to the urban blight of Las Vegas. Conley has often made music that reflects the wider expanses of the desert, but living in a city surrounded by it has opened up his sound even further. Here he displays finger picking that drones, that leads, that bounces, that grinds. Tempos flutter like ripples on ponds, notes cascading like rain on rooftops. Here Conley truly embraces guitar techniques he hasn't before. "God Doesn't Help Those Who Are Invisible" begins with the sound of crickets before drifting into a twangy nocturne, a pensive walk through a desert landscape of trying to find one's self, which drops us into 'Just One More Thing'. This track's Junior Kimbrough-esque blues drone momentum definitely lends itself to a bad drive to something unseemly. This trip ends in a road hazard fever dream named "Mojave Pastoral'. This track includes Adrian Voorhies of Cortege on shirtless jazz swing and Keith RN Chandler of odd. Circles on dual basses and their improvised performances to Conley's guitar, along with a disembodied field recording of an unsettling trip, provide a hallucinogenic chamber performance. The comedown from this is "We Are The Creatures This Desert Makes Us". The quietest and gentlest piece, it is the perfect lull before the storm that is "Beyond The Horse Gate'. This searing finale creeps in gently before building itself up into the loudest part of the whole record, the inevitable storm, the final decisive moment of clarity. And that is what this album ultimately is - a journey. Whether one across the country, or from destruction to health, or even vice versa, "Whatever Truthful Understanding" is the compelling feeling to seek out and process. A map for you, the listener. Keep your eyes on the road.
709388057421
Whatever Truthful Understanding
Artist: Droneroom
Format: CD
New: Available $8.99
Wish

Formats and Editions

DISC: 1

1. God Does Not Help Those Who Are Invisible
2. Just One More Thing
3. Mojave Pastoral
4. We Are the Creatures This Desert Makes Us
5. Beyond the Horse Gate

More Info:

The title "Whatever Truthful Understanding" is derived from the dedication in a century old book about the history of Kentucky. The music was written in the wake of an emotionally taxing relocation from Louisville to the urban blight of Las Vegas. Conley has often made music that reflects the wider expanses of the desert, but living in a city surrounded by it has opened up his sound even further. Here he displays finger picking that drones, that leads, that bounces, that grinds. Tempos flutter like ripples on ponds, notes cascading like rain on rooftops. Here Conley truly embraces guitar techniques he hasn't before. "God Doesn't Help Those Who Are Invisible" begins with the sound of crickets before drifting into a twangy nocturne, a pensive walk through a desert landscape of trying to find one's self, which drops us into 'Just One More Thing'. This track's Junior Kimbrough-esque blues drone momentum definitely lends itself to a bad drive to something unseemly. This trip ends in a road hazard fever dream named "Mojave Pastoral'. This track includes Adrian Voorhies of Cortege on shirtless jazz swing and Keith RN Chandler of odd. Circles on dual basses and their improvised performances to Conley's guitar, along with a disembodied field recording of an unsettling trip, provide a hallucinogenic chamber performance. The comedown from this is "We Are The Creatures This Desert Makes Us". The quietest and gentlest piece, it is the perfect lull before the storm that is "Beyond The Horse Gate'. This searing finale creeps in gently before building itself up into the loudest part of the whole record, the inevitable storm, the final decisive moment of clarity. And that is what this album ultimately is - a journey. Whether one across the country, or from destruction to health, or even vice versa, "Whatever Truthful Understanding" is the compelling feeling to seek out and process. A map for you, the listener. Keep your eyes on the road.
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